Announcements Celebrations

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Open Doors

2

Prayer Requests

3

Hymns for Him

3

Op—Eds

2

Outreach

2

Pastor’s Commentary

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Text Box: Hello My Friends,
 “Let freedom ring” our President said the morning of June 28th, as the Iraqi people were given back their country.  The liberation of the oppressed people in Iraq from Saddam Hussein’s murderous tyranny was not without great cost & tremendous sacrifice.  I watch with hope and anticipation to see if the Iraqi people can make democracy work in their country.  If they succeed, they will change the face of the Middle East, sending shock waves throughout the Islamic states that have shunned democracy.   From our own War of Independence, we know all too well the incredible price of liberty.  Freedom is never free & liberty is purchased with the blood of patriots.  Lest we forget amidst the fireworks and barbecues this Text Box: 4th of July, let us call to mind the fate of those 56 brave visionaries who pledged themselves to freedom and liberty by signing our Declaration of Independence.  For those of you have seen it before, I hope you'll appreciate reading it again. This is what happened to the 56 courageous men who signed the Declaration of Independence. 
Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died. Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. 
Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured. 
Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War. They signed and Text Box: they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor. What kind of men were they? 
Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured. Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags. Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family Text Box: Christian Church of God Newsletter
Text Box:   The Pastor’s Pen  
Text Box: Special points of interest:
Is Fellowship Intrinsic to the Church?
The Cost of Freedom
Prayer Changes Things
Ecumenical Singing
 A Cry is Heard

Text Box:              Volume 14, Issue 8

Contact the Editor at jdmrmc@arn.net /  or P. O. Box 33134, Amarillo, TX 79159